Create an AOI in RSLogix 5000 – Made Easy

This article is designed to give an easy illustration of how to make an add-on instruction using RSlogix 5000 but is not limited to just the lower versions of this software. Meaning, it carries over into the new Studio 5000 versions which have been made by Rockwell to fit all elements of the old software but to be more user-friendly in coming years.

To break down what I am saying further, the new suite of software which is Studio 5000 comes with a section for RSlogix 5000 in it so that no matter what version you are running, the software should be custom fit for your old and new applications.

Without further ado, I would like to talk about the two videos below which are made to show a simple application of a homemade add-on instruction which will be made from scratch breaking down the details in the different elements to give a more in-depth understanding without having to pay thousands of dollars for a custom class.

In video one, I show how to start a basic add-on instruction and talk about the difference of a parameters and local tags which both play their own part in an instruction to give a custom fit for your application. Showing that parameters can either be input or output and can be shown on the instruction or not.

Parameters of the add-on instruction can be as simple as a bool or as big as a float or Real.

The second side to this is local tags which are to use as inputs or outputs but are used internally to the instruction for basic functions that you program. In the case of the video above, the local tags are used for timers and bits that turn on and time out to made the conveyors work properly.

Examples of local tags;

Delay_To_Run as the local timer

OkTo_RunConveyor as a local bit

Next, in video one, I show how to export the newly made add-on instruction to be used in any program so I also show how to import that add-on instruction in an easy way to so that what you have made can be used as a modulus method to make future programming so much faster.

Note: Add-on instructions can be used in standard ladder logic or be used in function block programming as well.

 

In video two, I show the use of the AOI that we made for the conveyor control. I quickly go over the how we made the AOI and just give a rough view of what I am using to make the video. I add a few I/O modules even though I am using a virtual system with no real world I/O. These are shown to give a real-world idea of how things should be done, using alias tags.

This video shows the AOI being used in a faster programming method, adding several conveyor controls and show them being operated in real time for a full system.

I show how to look at each one of these instructions separately, meaning, looking at the base instruction logic and then showing how to look at the real-time instruction status as well. I show a simple way to change the command on times of each conveyor to get a staggered start of each conveyor to get a non-back pressure controlled system.

To show simple control of the system I use a NOP which is a no-operation rung and add the proper bits to control each conveyor to give an easy viewpoint for the video. The NOP rung is normally just used for program testing and is not meant to be left in the system so it is a best practice to delete the NOP rung when the system is working as you want it to and the bugs are worked out.

Showing both the ladder style use of the AOI and the function block use of the AOI.

I am keeping the wording in this article short and sweet because the videos basically hold the value of what I am trying to show.

I hope that you found this article helpful and of course if you have any questions or ideas for future articles then feel free to drop me a line.

 

 

Create an AOI in RSLogix 5000 – Made Easy

This article is designed to give an easy illustration of how to make an add-on instruction using RSlogix 5000 but is not limited to just the lower versions of this software. Meaning, it carries over into the new Studio 5000 versions which have been made by Rockwell to fit all elements of the old software but to be more user-friendly in coming years.

To break down what I am saying further, the new suite of software which is Studio 5000 comes with a section for RSlogix 5000 in it so that no matter what version you are running, the software should be custom fit for your old and new applications.

Without further ado, I would like to talk about the two videos below which are made to show a simple application of a homemade add-on instruction which will be made from scratch breaking down the details in the different elements to give a more in-depth understanding without having to pay thousands of dollars for a custom class.

In video one, I show how to start a basic add-on instruction and talk about the difference of a parameters and local tags which both play their own part in an instruction to give a custom fit for your application. Showing that parameters can either be input or output and can be shown on the instruction or not.

Parameters of the add-on instruction can be as simple as a bool or as big as a float or Real.

The second side to this is local tags which are to use as inputs or outputs but are used internally to the instruction for basic functions that you program. In the case of the video above, the local tags are used for timers and bits that turn on and time out to made the conveyors work properly.

Examples of local tags;

Delay_To_Run as the local timer

OkTo_RunConveyor as a local bit

Next, in video one, I show how to export the newly made add-on instruction to be used in any program so I also show how to import that add-on instruction in an easy way to so that what you have made can be used as a modulus method to make future programming so much faster.

Note: Add-on instructions can be used in standard ladder logic or be used in function block programming as well.

 

In video two, I show the use of the AOI that we made for the conveyor control. I quickly go over the how we made the AOI and just give a rough view of what I am using to make the video. I add a few I/O modules even though I am using a virtual system with no real world I/O. These are shown to give a real-world idea of how things should be done, using alias tags.

This video shows the AOI being used in a faster programming method, adding several conveyor controls and show them being operated in real time for a full system.

I show how to look at each one of these instructions separately, meaning, looking at the base instruction logic and then showing how to look at the real-time instruction status as well. I show a simple way to change the command on times of each conveyor to get a staggered start of each conveyor to get a non-back pressure controlled system.

To show simple control of the system I use a NOP which is a no-operation rung and add the proper bits to control each conveyor to give an easy viewpoint for the video. The NOP rung is normally just used for program testing and is not meant to be left in the system so it is a best practice to delete the NOP rung when the system is working as you want it to and the bugs are worked out.

Showing both the ladder style use of the AOI and the function block use of the AOI.

I am keeping the wording in this article short and sweet because the videos basically hold the value of what I am trying to show.

I hope that you found this article helpful and of course if you have any questions or ideas for future articles then feel free to drop me a line.

 

 

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